Oozing Goo - The Lava Lamp Syndicate

Hello everyone,

This week I tried various chemicals for the glitter lamp.

First I searched for safety data sheets for glitter.

Because the safety data sheets contain the density of glitter. From this I can calculate the density of the liquid. The chemicals I will use must be non-hazardous. I used PERC in my previous work. I have now tried four different chemicals.

1- Mono ethylene glycol. d= 1.12 g/cm3

2- Glycerin d= 1.26 g/cm3

3- 50% potassium carbonate solution. d= 1.50 g/cm3

Densities%20of%20Aqueous%20Solutions%20of%20Inorganic%20Potassium%2...

4- Sugar (sucrose) solution (65 - 70%). d= 1.35 g/cm3

Density%20of%20Aqueous%20Solutions%20of%20Organic%20Substances%20as...

5- Calcium Chloride (42%).  d= 1.435 g/cm3

Calcium%20Chloride.pdf

6- Calcium Nitrate solution (45%). d= 1.45 -1.50 g/cm3

MSDS from Calcium Nitrate solution 17212.pdf

7- PERC (banned chemical) For this reason, I try the above alternatives.

Density of glitter = 1.4 g/cm3

GLI0137%20Glitter%20F.pdf

When I used mono ethylene glycol and glycerin, the glitters remained at the bottom. He didn't move.

When I used 50% potassium carbonate solution, the glitters stayed on top. He didn't move.

The solution was too alkaline (pH=12), the substance that gave shine to the glitters disappeared.

BEFORE

AFTER

There is only one sugar left. It's okay, it moves very slowly. But safe, but not used as a glitter jam.

Video

https://youtu.be/loGlrpKASX0

Views: 421

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

You might want to try calcium chloride. I don't think it will alter the PH as much since it is a salt.

would it be possible to find glitter that is less dense? if not, then according to this site you could probably make it work with calcium chloride.

Yes, I might to try calcium chloride. I tried before. I didn't like it very much. I'm going to give it a try. Although it is salt, the pH of calcium chloride is low.

The pH of the original calcium chloride hexahydrate solution was indeed too low (3.7 at 20 ºC). This suggests that this very hygroscopic and deliquescent salt may have partially reacted with (presumably) atmospheric CO2, accordingly:

CaCl2 + H2O ↔ CaO + 2HCl; CaO + CO2 → CaCO3↓.

HCl is acid. Hydrochloric acid. So it's acidic.

Autumn said:

You might want to try calcium chloride. I don't think it will alter the PH as much since it is a salt.

I know the site in the link you mentioned. I've reviewed it before. Since I'm having trouble with calcium chloride, I've been trying alternatives.

tim said:

would it be possible to find glitter that is less dense? if not, then according to this site you could probably make it work with calcium chloride.

Here is information about the calcium chloride solution, its density and %.

Calcium%20Chloride.pdf

You might want to use a solvent resistant glitter so it last longer

I often use the same glitters with perchlorethylene. There is no problem. But alkali does harm.

Claude J said:

You might want to use a solvent resistant glitter so it last longer

give it a couple of months,, :)

Tevfik Dogruman said:

I often use the same glitters with perchlorethylene. There is no problem. But alkali does harm.

Claude J said:

You might want to use a solvent resistant glitter so it last longer

I started working on experimenting with calcium chloride.

I bought technical grade calcium chloride dihydrate. Its purity is 99%. When I reviewed the literature, all the charts and tables are pure calcium chloride. The calcium chloride composition in the calcium chloride dihydrate that I bought it is 75.49% . Composition (% CaCl2)

Weighing 240 grams of calcium chloride dihydrate. I then dissolved it in 180 grams of water.

According to this:

Solution = 240 + 180 = 420g Here is the ratio. (240 x100 ) / 420 = 57,143%

But the calcium chloride content is 75.49%

Calcium chloride dihydrate purity 99%

Pure calcium chloride % that my solution should be:

57,143 x 0,7549 x 0,99 = 42,70%

 As can be seen in the picture below, I have theoretically reached a density of 42% and 1,435 g/ml.

So far, so good. I stopped working because of my job. I had turned off the heating system of the house because I was traveling. When I got home, the temperature in the room was 15 - 16 degrees Celsius and my calcium chloride solution had crystallized.

Coming soon...

looking forward to your next post

Tevfik Dogruman said:

I started working on experimenting with calcium chloride.

I bought technical grade calcium chloride dihydrate. Its purity is 99%. When I reviewed the literature, all the charts and tables are pure calcium chloride. The calcium chloride composition in the calcium chloride dihydrate that I bought it is 75.49% . Composition (% CaCl2)

Weighing 240 grams of calcium chloride dihydrate. I then dissolved it in 180 grams of water.

According to this:

Solution = 240 + 180 = 420g Here is the ratio. (240 x100 ) / 420 = 57,143%

But the calcium chloride content is 75.49%

Calcium chloride dihydrate purity 99%

Pure calcium chloride % that my solution should be:

57,143 x 0,7549 x 0,99 = 42,70%

 As can be seen in the picture below, I have theoretically reached a density of 42% and 1,435 g/ml.

So far, so good. I stopped working because of my job. I had turned off the heating system of the house because I was traveling. When I got home, the temperature in the room was 15 - 16 degrees Celsius and my calcium chloride solution had crystallized.

Coming soon...

In the beginning everything was fine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0OGbBLyjRQ

Now it is necessary to balance the density. I will do this by adding distilled water. It should neither sink to the bottom nor stay completely above.

Everything is ok. I'll continue in the morning now it's pretty late.

It's the same result. Glitter has no shine. The calcium chloride solution also destroyed the shine of the glitter.

Glitters became transparent.

Most likely, the glitter I use is very poor quality or there is another problem.

I filtered the whole calcium chloride solution. I added glitters that lost all their shine. I balanced the density.

Finally, I made a lamp made of glitter that lost its shine.

Here's the video

https://youtu.be/0NBvgLPdTP0

is the cloudyness the shine thats now in the CC?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

About

Mark Goo created this Ning Network.

Support Oozing Goo

By using the eBay button above, you support OG if you purchase anything. Thanks for thinking of us. Mark Goo

© 2022   Created by Mark Goo.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service